Understand UI in 7 Simple Points

A website is much more than a group of pages connected by links. It’s an interface, a space where different things — in this case, a person and a company’s or individual’s web presence — meet, communicate, and affect each other. That interaction creates an experience for the visitor, and as a web designer, it’s your job to ensure that experience is as good as it can possibly be.

And the key to that is to think about your user first, foremost, and always.

Simplicity

A quality user interface is made up of necessary elements that are logical and concise. While you are working on the design of your interface, ask yourself “Does the user really need this to compete their task?” before adding features and content. Limit your interface to the items that are essential for the user. Don’t add items just to feed your ego, but rather, focus on the quality of the user experience.

Clarity

Clarity is one of the most important attributes of any user interface. Keep in mind that your user interface exists for the sole purpose of facilitating users interacting with your system. To do this it must clearly communicate with users. If users can’t figure out how to use your interface easily they will become frustrated and abandon the experience.

Consistency

With your user interface, you will want to maintain consistency throughout the entire experience. Consistent interfaces will allow your users to rely on and develop usage patterns that will improve the experience. People crave consistency and you should give your users the opportunity to be proven correct when they rely on it.

Maintain language, layout and design throughout your interface. By doing so you make it easier on your users to understand how things will work, increase their efficiency and improve the user experience.

Familiarity

Your interface will feel familiar if users don’t have to think how to use it because they already understand it. When users are familiar with something, they know what to expect and don’t have to think about what to do. Because of this, work to identify areas of your design where you can leverage familiarity to make interacting with your system easier for your users.

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Visual Hierarchy

One attribute that is often overlooked but is important is a quality UI is designing your interface so that it allows users to focus on what is important. If you try to make everything look important you just create information overload and reduce the quality of the user experience. The contrast between the different sizes, colours and placements of elements should work together to give a clear understanding of your interface and what a user should do. A well designed visual hierarchy reduces the appearance of complexity and helps users accomplish their tasks.

Efficiency

Your user interface is how a user will get to where they want to go and do what they want to do. A quality user interface allows users to perform tasks with speed and ease, in other words, it operates with efficiency. One of the best ways to improve the efficiency of your interface is through task analysis.

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Responsiveness

When it comes to the responsiveness of an interface, you want your interface, and the system behind it, to work fast. Users easily become frustrated having to wait for a web site to load for instance.

Additionally, when you think about responsiveness you should also think about your interface responding to users. Your user interface should provide feedback to the users. Let your users know what is happening and that their effort to engage with the interface has been understood.

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Fascinating Stories Behind Unusual Logo Designs!!

Logos are the chief visual component of a company’s overall brand identity.

Logos are everywhere. On the clothes we wear, on the phones we use, and on the food we buy. While some logos are incredibly straightforward — a letterform or a pictorial representation, some are more complex.

Logos are designed to create a brand for a company or a product. Have you noticed how a good logo becomes instantly associated with a brand? The designers who design the logo usually try their level best to instil trust, loyalty and, of course, a willingness for you to part with your money, all in one simple graphic.

A lot of thought and effort goes behind these logos and here are the stories behind some of the logos you might recognize:

 

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Amazon is a powerhouse when it comes to online shopping, and their logo reflects that. If it weren’t for the arrow, the logo would be a pretty boring one and that arrow has meaning behind it. The idea is that the arrow represents both a smile and it shows that you can buy anything from Amazon: from A to Z.

 

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The FedEx logo has a hidden meaning that is so hidden, that we doubt that you have ever noticed it. The design makes use of something called negative space to convey the company’s core values in the logo, speed and precision. Take another look at the logo and you will see the hidden arrow between the E and the X.

 

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The name of the biggest coffee shop company in the world comes from the novel Moby Dick and picture in the middle began life as a fishtailed siren of the sea. Originally the logo caused controversy because the siren was topless, so the company have toned the image down over the years to the more acceptable one that we know now with her hair tastefully protecting her modesty.

 

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A bit geeky this one, but the logo for the Sony Vaio is pretty clever. The left hand side of the symbol of a wave which represents analogue technology and the right hand side is a 1 and 0 to represent the binary code used by computers. The name itself, Vaio, is an acronym for Video Audio Intelligent Organizer.

 

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The Toblerone Mountain is a depiction of the Matterhorn, which is located between Switzerland and Italy and, if you look carefully, you will see that there is the shape of a bear in the snow. The bear is the official symbol of the town of Bern, which is where the chocolate was first made.

Logos are the chief visual component of a company’s overall brand identity. The logo appears on stationery, websites, business cards and advertising. For that reason, a well-designed logo can contribute to business success, while a substandard logo can imply amateurishness and turn off potential customers. As consumers grow to know, like and trust a specific brand, they are more likely to respond positively to successive encounters with a logo–potentially leading to increased sales or improved mind share within the target market.

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The Difference between UI and UX

Let us get down to basics!

UI is User Interface: This is what users interact with directly. Everything they see, touch and hear within a piece of software or a website. It’s the outermost layer of an app – the controls.

UX is User eXperience: This is a holistic term encapsulating each and every different kind of touchpoint a user has with a product.

A common misconception at workplace, in client meetings and often in job listings or job requirements, is the unintentional combination or swap of these two terms.

In most cases, the mistaken expectation is that an interface designer by default will understand or focus on user experience, because their work is in direct contact with the user. But the fact remains that user interface is not user experience.

The confusion may occur because both abbreviations start with letter “U”. Most likely, it comes from the overlap of the skill-sets involved in both disciplines. They are definitely related areas, and in fact, many designers are knowledgeable and competent in both.

However, despite the overlap, both fields are considerably different in nature, overall objectives and scope.

UI design aims at creating effective and attractive user interface while UX design aims at providing positive user experience. Interaction with a product via user interface is a part of user experience, so we can state that UX design as a term and as a field of design is broader and includes UI design as its integral part.

When good user experience is achieved, every desirable or positive effect that one could possibly think of flows from it. UX is focused on success of the whole. In reality, the product is not the sum of its parts; the experience is.

User-Experience

Working on the UX for a digital product such as a website or mobile app, UX designers have to concentrate on such aspects as:

  1. USABILITY (the product is convenient, clear, logical and easy to use)
  2. UTILITY (the product provides useful content and solves users’ problems)
  3. ACCESSIBILITY (the product is convenient for different categories of users)
  4. DESIRABILITY (the product is attractive and problem-solving, it retains users and creates the positive experience which they are ready to repeat).

UI design is the stage of setting and polishing all the details of the interface. User Interface is actually a finalized interactive field in which the user interacts with the product. It includes all the tools of increasing usability and satisfying target users’ needs and wishes. All the features of visual perception as well sound and tactile feelings influencing the product use and interaction with is should be analyzed and optimized here to the purpose of the app or a website is designed.

For example, such aspects as color palette, types and fonts, shapes and forms, illustration and animation and so on and so forth are able to affect the performance of the final product greatly in both positive and negative way.

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