Fascinating Stories Behind Unusual Logo Designs!!

Logos are the chief visual component of a company’s overall brand identity.

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Logos are everywhere. On the clothes we wear, on the phones we use, and on the food we buy. While some logos are incredibly straightforward — a letterform or a pictorial representation, some are more complex.

Logos are designed to create a brand for a company or a product. Have you noticed how a good logo becomes instantly associated with a brand? The designers who design the logo usually try their level best to instil trust, loyalty and, of course, a willingness for you to part with your money, all in one simple graphic.

A lot of thought and effort goes behind these logos and here are the stories behind some of the logos you might recognize:

 

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Amazon is a powerhouse when it comes to online shopping, and their logo reflects that. If it weren’t for the arrow, the logo would be a pretty boring one and that arrow has meaning behind it. The idea is that the arrow represents both a smile and it shows that you can buy anything from Amazon: from A to Z.

 

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The FedEx logo has a hidden meaning that is so hidden, that we doubt that you have ever noticed it. The design makes use of something called negative space to convey the company’s core values in the logo, speed and precision. Take another look at the logo and you will see the hidden arrow between the E and the X.

 

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The name of the biggest coffee shop company in the world comes from the novel Moby Dick and picture in the middle began life as a fishtailed siren of the sea. Originally the logo caused controversy because the siren was topless, so the company have toned the image down over the years to the more acceptable one that we know now with her hair tastefully protecting her modesty.

 

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A bit geeky this one, but the logo for the Sony Vaio is pretty clever. The left hand side of the symbol of a wave which represents analogue technology and the right hand side is a 1 and 0 to represent the binary code used by computers. The name itself, Vaio, is an acronym for Video Audio Intelligent Organizer.

 

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The Toblerone Mountain is a depiction of the Matterhorn, which is located between Switzerland and Italy and, if you look carefully, you will see that there is the shape of a bear in the snow. The bear is the official symbol of the town of Bern, which is where the chocolate was first made.

Logos are the chief visual component of a company’s overall brand identity. The logo appears on stationery, websites, business cards and advertising. For that reason, a well-designed logo can contribute to business success, while a substandard logo can imply amateurishness and turn off potential customers. As consumers grow to know, like and trust a specific brand, they are more likely to respond positively to successive encounters with a logo–potentially leading to increased sales or improved mind share within the target market.

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Start your Website Design with Great Copy

Anyone can write. But have you ever wondered why some websites draw your attention more than the others? They make you stay on their page, read the blogs, capture the mysterious ‘know, like and trust’ and sometimes make you to buy their stuff?

Before getting into the context of the web, its danger and warning signs, the first thing you need to know is that anyone can produce good content. But it’s the ability to differentiate the good from the bad that sets the professionals apart from the beginners.

As a business you need to work on developing engaging, meaningful web copy which is a balance of Function and Emotion. It can be tricky.

Sell it in the title

You can write the greatest copy in the world, but if your headline is weak, no one’s going to read it. Did you know that most people read just the headline – only few read the rest? This is why a solid headline is important. There’s no magic formula for writing a good headline, but some time-tested strategies include the direct approach (e.g. “Flat 50%”), the how-to approach (e.g. “How to Use Google Analytics”) and the list approach (e.g. top 5 cruelty-free makeup products).

Tell stories

People like good stories. Stories resonate with us – statistics don’t. Journalists have known this for ages. If you’re writing marketing copy, the same rule applies. You can tell your readers all impressive statistics and technical details about your product/service, they’ll smile. If you really want to get their attention, however, give them a good story. Open with a compelling story. Provide case studies. Highlight testimonials from your customers.

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Be specific

The visitors to your website who are the most likely to convert, are the ones who are looking for something specific. Don’t speak in generalities about how your company sells “high-quality leather goods,” or “software that will maximize your business’s conversion rate.” What kinds of leather goods do you sell? How does your software maximize conversion rates? The more questions you can answer for your reader right off the bat, the better.

Avoid jargon

Every industry has its jargon. In this industry, for example, we talk about SEO, SEM, PPC, and ROI. Jargon serves a purpose as convenient shorthand for those in the know, but you can’t always expect your readers to be familiar with it. Even if you’re marketing to other businesses in your industry, a more informal approach often works better.

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Use persuasive language

Did you know the 5 most persuasive words in the English language? The words are “you,” “free,” “because,” “instantly,” and “new.” Readers want to feel like they are being personally addressed (you) they want to know what’s in it for them (because), and they like things that are free, new, and instant (who doesn’t?). Some other words you might want to add to that list are “win,” “how”, and “save.” Just make sure that these words are used in an appropriate context, and that they accurately describe what it is that you’re offering.

End with a call to action

This is Marketing 101. The conclusion of your copy should always answer the question “What next?” If you’ve done a good job with your copy, I’m going to be ready to pursue next steps. Tell me what those steps are. Maybe you want people to sign up for an email list. Maybe you want people to add an item to their shopping cart. Maybe you want people to Tweet your article. In any case, the call to action should be clear and definite. If there’s no call to action, what was the point of the copy?

Hope you enjoyed reading the Blog!!

Have a good weekend guys!

@ReTweaks Private Limited